We follow the schedule for the national Immunisation programme. Consent forms are sent in advance of the immunisation session via your child if attending school. These must be returned within the stated timeframe if your child is to be vaccinated on the date arranged with school. Catch-up clinics are held in school at a later date for those absent on the day or who return a late form.

If your child is home schooled or not in education, if we have been made aware of your child’s details either through the County Council or school, we will send out a consent form and return envelope to your home address. We will then arrange a clinic appointment with you once the form has been retuned.

We also offer a catch-up programme for all school age vaccinations up (and including) year 11. This is done either via school or community setting.

Vaccines save lives.jpgWithout vaccines, we are at risk of serious illness and disability from diseases like meningitis, measles pneumonia, tetanus and polio. It is estimated that childhood vaccines alone save over 4 million lives every year.

Vaccines protect ourselves and those around us. Not everyone can be vaccinated so they depend on others to be vaccinated to ensure they are also safe from vaccine preventable diseases (World Health Organisation 2020)

Vaccines work by causing the body’s immune system to make antibodies (substances to fight infection and disease). So, if you come into contact with the infection, the antibodies will recognise it and help to protect you.

How do vaccines work- Oxford Vaccine Group YouTube?

If you have consented for your child to receive a vaccination, but at the session they refuse, we will not coerce them into having the vaccination. We will discuss the vaccination with them so they have been informed of the benefits and risks. We will inform you of their refusal and discuss the best way to support them to have the vaccination.  

Very occasionally a young person under the age of 16 may request a vaccination without parental consent.  In these circumstances an experienced Immunisation Nurse would make a thorough assessment of the young person’s understanding, knowledge and competence to make such a decision. If the decision is made that they have the right level of knowledge and understanding, and they cannot be persuaded to discuss it with their parents, the Immunisation Nurse may go ahead and vaccinate the young person. This is known as being Gillick Competent.

If a Gillick-competent child consents to treatment, a parent cannot override that consent.

Further information can be found at the links below:

NHS -  Children and young people - Consent to treatment

NSPCC - Gillick competency and Fraser guidelines

A person who signs a consent form must have parental responsibility for that child.

This could be:

  • the child's mother or father
  • the child's legally appointed guardian
  • a person with a residence order concerning the child
  • a local authority designated to care for the child
  • a local authority or person with an emergency protection order for the child

If you sign a consent form for a child and you don’t have parental responsibility, this may delay the child receiving their vaccination.

Further information can be found at the Gov.uk link below:

Parental rights and responsibilities

Flu vaccine

Flu is a very unpleasant illness. It is spread from the mouth or nose by coughs and sneezes. Every year flu kills thousands of people. 

The Children’s flu vaccine is offered yearly as a nasal spray which is squirted up each nostril. Not only is it needle-free (a big advantage for children), it works even better than the injected flu vaccine with fewer side effects. It’s quick and painless and will mean your child is less likely to become ill if they come into contact with the flu virus.

Benefits of Flu Vaccination for children and young people

  • Helps protect against getting flu and associated complications such as bronchitis and pneumonia.
  • Minimises spread of flu in the community. Immunising a high number of individuals helps reduce the transmission to those who are more at risk of the disease. This is called Herd Immunity.
  • Reduces the number of people becoming ill and visiting their GP. 
  • Reduces the number of hospital admissions and visits to A&E.
  • Delivering the programme through schools is the best way to ensure maximum number of children are protected which can help also help reduce pupil absence.

If your child attends school, they will receive a letter and a consent form to be completed as soon as possible and returned to school to be collected by the Immunisation team.  The date of the school vaccination should be shared with you by school.

If your child doesn’t attend school, you will receive this information in the post with a return envelope. Once we have received the consent form, you and your child will be invited to attend a community clinic.

We do hold regular flu catch-up clinics for pupils who miss the vaccination in school. Details of these clinics will be shared with schools following your child’s school flu vaccination session.

Top tips for completing the nasal flu consent form

  • Don’t forget to sign the form, and remember it must be signed by the person with parental responsibility.
  • It’s really important to include an up-to-date phone number, this is essential if we need to ring you for further information.
  • Complete one form per child, please don’t include siblings on the same form
  • Ensure you answer all the questions
  • If there are any changes to your child’s health after returning the consent form please inform the Immunisation Team.
  • If your child has their flu vaccine at the GPs after you have returned your consent form please let the Immunisation Team know.

Porcine gelatine content in the nasal flu vaccine

The nasal flu vaccine contains a highly processed form of gelatine (porcine gelatine) which is used in a range of many essential medicines. An alternative injectable flu vaccination is available. Further information is available at:

Vaccine and porcine gelatine information

Further information about the delivery of the nasal flu spray can be seen in this video which can be shared with your child.

Flu Heroes - Nasal Flu Spray for Kids - YouTube

Further information is available at:

Children's flu vaccine

Protect yourself against flu – information for parents and carers of preschool and primary school-aged children  

Protect yourself against flu – information for those in school years 7 to 11


Diphtheria Tetanus and Polio vaccine (DTP)

This vaccination is also known as the teenage booster and is given to boost protection against 3 different diseases. It is routinely offered to young people in Year 9 in school or at a community clinic for those not attending school. It is given as an injection in the upper arm.

Diphtheria

This is a highly contagious and potentially fatal infection affecting the nose and throat. It can damage the heart and nervous system.

Tetanus

This is a serious condition caused by germs found in the soil and manure getting into a wound.

Polio

This is a virus that attacks the nervous system and can cause permanent paralysis of muscles.

Further information is available at:

3-in-1 teenage booster overview

A guide to immunisation for young people: your questions answered about the HPV, Td/IPV and MenACWY vaccinations given between school years 7 to 13


Meningococcal ACWY Vaccine (Men ACWY)

This is also an injection and is offered to year 9 young people at the same time as the DTP vaccine.  It is to protect against 4 strains of meningococcal bacteria which can lead to meningitis and septicaemia. Meningitis can be very serious if not treated quickly and can cause life threatening blood poisoning (septicaemia).

If a young person misses these vaccinations in year 9, we will continue to offer them in year 10 and 11. After this, an appointment for these vaccinations can be made at the GP’s.

Further information is available at:

MenACWY vaccine overview

A guide to immunisation for young people: your questions answered about the HPV, Td/IPV and MenACWY vaccinations given between school years 7 to 13


HPV vaccine

HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) is a name given to a very common group of viruses. The vaccine helps to protect from being infected by HPV. This is important as the virus increases the risk of developing some cancers such as cervical, anal, genital, head and neck cancers. It also protects against some HPV types responsible for genital warts.

All children age 12 – 13 (school year 8) will be offered this vaccine. This will either be done in school or a community clinic if your child doesn’t attend school.

To achieve optimal immune response 2 doses are required, usually given 6 – 24 months apart. If your child is over the age of 15 when they receive their 1st dose, a 3 dose regime is required for optimal immune response. 

If your child misses the vaccination in year 8, we will continue to offer the vaccination in year 9, 10 and 11. After this, an appointment for these vaccinations can be made at the GP’s up to the young person’s 25th birthday.

Is the HPV vaccine safe?

Yes. For more than 10 years the safety of the HPV vaccine has been strictly monitored and frequently reviewed by many international bodies including:

• The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulation Agency (MHRA UK);

• The European Medicines Agency (EMA);

• The World Health Organization (WHO) Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety.

These international bodies have continually reported that the vaccine is safe with no known long-term side effects. The WHO listed 121 countries using HPV vaccine around the world (2018).

Over 10.5 million doses have been given in the UK since 2008, and more than 80 million people have been vaccinated worldwide.

“The World Health Organization strongly recommends HPV vaccine to prevent cervical cancer.” Robb Butler, Head of Immunisation, World Health Organization, Europe

Further information is available at:

HPV vaccine overview

HPV vaccination protecting against HPV infection to help reduce your risk of cancer


MMR vaccine

MMR protects against measles (M), mumps (M) and rubella (R; German measles).

Measles can cause ear infections, respiratory problems, meningitis and encephalitis (inflammation of the brain).

Mumps can cause deafness, usually with partial or complete recovery. It can also cause painful and swollen testicles in teenage boys and men and inflammation of the ovaries in girls and women.

Rubella can also cause inflammation of the brain and can affect blood clotting. In pregnant women it can cause miscarriage or major health problems for their babies such as blindness, deafness, heart problems or brain damage.

Side effects of the vaccination are very rare but after about 10 days, your child may become feverish, develop a measles-like rash and go off their food as the measles part of the vaccine starts to work. They may also get some aches and pains in their joints. About two weeks after receiving MMR they may very rarely, get a rash of bruise-like spots due to the rubella part of the immunisation. This usually gets better on its own, but if you see spots like this, show them to your doctor. About three weeks after the injection they might occasionally get a mild form of mumps as the mumps part of MMR kicks in.

2 doses are required for this vaccination and it is very important you check your child has had both doses.

Currently these vaccinations are provided by your child’s GP. If you are unsure if your child has had either or both doses, please check with their GP who should be able to advise you. If your child is of school age and has never had an MMR vaccination then they will require one now and the 2nd in a month’s time. 

Further information is available at:

MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine

For information in alternative languages:

What to expect after vaccinations

Vaccine and porcine gelatine information

Protect yourself against flu – information for those in school years 7 to 11 leaflet:

EnglishEnglish large printAlbanianArabicBengaliBrazilian PortugueseBulgarianChineseEstonianFarsiGreekGujaratiHindiLatvianLithuanianPanjabi

PolishRomanianRomanyRussianSomaliSpanishTurkishTwiUkrainianUrdu and Yiddish.

Braille version of this leaflet is available to order.

British Sign Language video is available to view and download.

 

Protect yourself against flu – information for parents and carers of preschool and primary school-aged children leaflet:

EnglishEnglish large printAlbanianArabicBengaliBrazilian PortugueseBulgarianChineseEstonianFarsiGreekGujaratiHindiLatvianLithuanianPanjabi

PolishRomanianRomanyRussianSomaliSpanishTurkishTwiUkrainianUrdu and Yiddish.

Braille version of this leaflet is available to order.

British Sign Language video is available to view and download.

We have 2 teams across the county:

North School Aged Immunisation Department

Carlisle
01228 608046
ncm-tr.northschoolagedimmunisationteam@nhs.net

Workington
01900 705867
ncm-tr.westschoolimmsteam@nhs.net

South School Aged Immunisation Department

Kendal
01539 718016 or 715277
southschoolageImmunisationteam@cumbria.nhs.uk

Barrow
01229 409608
southschoolageImmunisationteam@cumbria.nhs.uk